Where to go in January | Pura Aventura Blog - We make travel personal

Where to go in January

Find out our pick of the best sights in January.

COSTA RICA: sunshine & wildlife

January is one of the best (and consequently most popular) months to travel to Costa Rica; the weather is relatively dry in much of the country, and everything is still green. With early January being the peak holiday season, aim to travel in the second half of the month when it is a little less busy, but with ideal conditions on the Pacific side in particular. It’s also a cracking month on the wildlife front, with great numbers of Olive Ridleys and green turtles, two-toed sloths, the resplendent quetzal preparing for nesting season, tons of migratory bird species from North America, and humpback whales visible from or near both Pacific and Caribbean coasts.

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SPAIN: snow & culture
Most people probably wouldn’t think of heading to Spain in January, with the exception of those heading off for some Pyrenees skiing. Sure enough, you can expect there to be decent snow on the ground in our favourite ski resort, Cerler, at this time of year. As a bonus, there is hardly anyone on the slopes. It is also well worth considering a city break – the likes of Barcelona and Madrid tend to have their bluest skies of the year this month – sunglasses and scarves all round. Also, if you want to prolong your New Year’s festivities, don’t forget that Spain is big on Epiphany – the 5th January sees processions across the country, and the 6th is the Three Kings Day, when children receive their presents (rather than on Christmas Day).

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ANTARCTICA: penguins & sea lions
If wildlife is your priority for an Antarctic visit, you arguably don’t want to look past January as the time to go. This is when you’ll find newly-hatched penguin chicks banded together on the beaches and hassling their parents for food. On the mammal side, the sea lion pups born earlier in the season are starting to take their first plunge into the southern oceans. The warmer temperatures may not mean it’s sunbathing weather, but they do open up passage further south, allowing rare access down past the Antarctic Circle and into the Ross Sea.

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